Seminar

Seminar

Genome editing using CRISPR

  • POSTED DATE : 2018-11-01
  • WRITER : 관리자
  • HIT : 268
  • DATE : 2018-11-01
  • PLACE : 화학관 서병인강의실(330226호)

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제  목 : Genome editing using CRISPR

연  사 : 배상수 교수님(한양대학교 화학과)       

일  시 : 2018년 11월 1일(목) 오후 4시 30분 
장  소 : 화학관 2층 서병인강의실(330226호실)

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Genome editing using CRISPR

 

Sangsu Bae (sangsubae@hanyang.ac.kr)

Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seoul 04763, South Korea

 

Genome editing with engineered nucleases such as ZFNs (zinc finger nucleases), TALENs (transcription-activator-like effector nucleases), and CRISPR-Cas9/Cpf1 derived RNA-guided endonucleases is broadly used for biomedical research, biotechnology, and medicine. In addition, CRISPR base editors that enable the direct conversion of DNA bases without producing double-stranded breaks (DSBs) of DNA were developed. Unlike ZFNs and TALENs whose DNA specificities are determined by DNA-binding proteins, CRISPR nucleases use complementary base pairing to recognize target sites. Now, CRISPR nucleases are widely exploited due to the ease of use and inexpensive cost; researchers can induce gene editing at different sites by simply altering the guide RNAs. However, CRISPR nucleases cleave not only on-target sites but also off-target sites that differ by up to several nucleotides from the on-target sites, causing unwanted off-target mutations and chromosomal rearrangements. Here I present web-based programs, named CRISPR RGEN Tools (www.rgenome.net), including a novel CRISPR design tool and a genome editing assessment tool. These tools are indispensable for gene mutation in human cells, animals and plants. Furthermore, I would introduce versatile applications of CRISPR nucleases such as a one-step transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and petunia by the DNA-free CRISPR, a circulating tumor DNA detection and the detailed mechanism of Cas9/Cpf1 revealed by single-molecule fluorescence imaging. Ultimately, I would also introduce my on-going study – molecular cloning in human cells.